Monthly Archives: March 2011

Calling all Filmmakers: Deadline Nears for IFP Labs

I am proud to be a part of the IFP Filmmaker Labs which are the first ever completion, distribution and marketing lab. The deadlines for this year’s cycle is fast approaching. Documentary films must apply online by March 11th. Narrative films have until April 8th to apply online. Even though IFP and the labs are located in NYC, films from across the United States and the rest of the world are encouraged to apply. The labs are also FREE, but you do have to pay your own way to get to and stay in NYC for the three lab periods (May or June, September, December).

Lab alumni are already showing well this year. Three premiered in Competition at Sundance 2011: Alrick Brown’s Kinyarwanda, Andrew Dosunmu’s Restless City and Dee Rees’ Pariah which was acquired by Focus Features. Victoria Mahoney’s Yelling to the Sky premiered in Competition at the Berlin International Film Festival followed by SXSW. Also premiering at SXSW is Sara Terry’s documentary Fambul Tok. Alumni also showed at DOCNYC, Slamdance, and the upcoming Thessaloniki Documentary Festival.

Here is the official blurb from IFP:
IFP Independent Filmmaker Labs
Call for Entries: First Feature Directors with Documentary or Narrative Films in Post-Production
Documentary Deadline: March 11 Narrative Deadline: April 8
IFP’s Independent Filmmaker Labs are a year-long fellowship supporting independent filmmakers when they need it most: through the completion, marketing, and distribution of their first features. Labs provide community, mentorship, and film-specific strategies to help filmmakers reach their artistic goals, support the film’s launch, and maximize exposure in the global marketplace. The program consists of three focused workshops in spring, fall and winter in New York City.

IFP seeks to ensure that at least half of participating projects have an inclusive range of voices in key positions. We especially encourage female and minority directors to apply, as well as filmmakers from outside NY & LA.

Open to all first time documentary and narrative feature directors with films in post-production. Additional information and online application:

Bomb It iPhone App Launched

Very excited to announce the Bomb It iPhone app is now out and up on  iTunes stores around the world.   This is not an app to watch the film (that is available on regular iTunes).   This is an app to share the graffiti and street art you love with others.   It is free – and is intended to create a broader community around Bomb It.

One of the issues with apps like this: they depend on adoption.  It is important it is important to get some early adopters to start using it.   Unfortunately it is impossible to use an iPhone app until it is on the store.  So its available to be used – but it is a little bare right now.   I welcome you to take it for a test drive.  If you have an interest in graffiti and/or street art, have an iPhone and know where some good looking street art is near you – please download the app, take a photo and load it up!!   The Android version will be up in a few weeks.

The Bomb It App is Now Available

Share Photos of Your Favorite Graffiti and Street Art
with Loads More Exclusive Features!
click for iTunes store

Prevent Film Piracy and Globally Monetize Instantly

Today’s guest post is by filmmaker Solomon Mac-Auley who contacted me to offer his opinion about a DIY Digital alternative that I have been intrigued by called Egg Up.   Egg Up offers an elegant solution for filmmakers to monetize their films via Electronic Sell Through (previously known as Download to Own) by selling a film digitally while protecting it from being copied.    I was curious as to how consumer experience was with the service – so here is Solomon’s feeling about Egg Up:

Prevent Film Piracy and Globally Monetize Instantly by Solomon Mac-Auley, QNX LTD

The Challenge:

Piracy is the biggest worldwide threat to the film industry. The internet and social media have made it easy for consumers to pirate and share movies illegally. This growing model has disrupted and destroyed the traditional distribution channels such as DVDs, theatres, video stores and pay-per-view providers. It also doesn’t help that many platforms and media channels do not have any digital-rights-management (DRM) in place to prevent piracy. This phenomenon has cost the industry a whopping $18.2 billion and the figure is growing daily and has left in its wake a growing number of frustrated filmmakers and distributors who are unable to monetize their films. Continue reading →